Reflections On a City

Valentin Hennequin and Georgia Thompson’s sleek shoot on the streets of Paris

Full look Lemaire, additional under shirt Dries Van Noten, briefcase by Berluti

L: Shirt, jumper, jacket and bag Dior Men, trousers Zegna, shoes Lemaire. R: Full look Bottega Veneta

Shirt Ernest W.Baker, suit Brioni, coat and tie Dunhill, shoes Hermès

L: Full look Louis Vuitton, tie Dunhill. R: Shirt Ernest W.Baker, suit Brioni, tie Dunhill, shoes Hermès

Full look Miu Miu, roll neck stylists own, trousers Zegna

Full look and scarf Hermès, shoes Prada

Full look Prada

Full suit Celine, coat GmbH

Full look Givenchy

Photography Valentin Hennequin
 
 
 
 
Styling assistant Ophelie Cozette

Still Yawning


Left: Jacket GENEVIEVE Shirt KIKO KOSTADINOV Trousers KIKO KOSTADINOV Shoes KIKO KOSTADINOV Right: Jumper LOEWE Trousers PRONOUNCE Shoes BOTTEGA VENETA

CANALI Sunglasses Stylist’s own

Top ACNE STUDIO Skirt ACNE STUDIO Corset IZABELLA BILINSKA Sunglasses MICHAEL KORS AT LUXOTTICA Shoes KIKO KOSTADINOV

Jacket LOEWE T-shirt MARTINE ROSE Trousers PER GÖTESSON Shoes MARTINE ROSE

Jumper BOTTEGA VENETA Trousers BOTTEGA VENETA Scarf ACNE STUDIO Shoes BOTTEGA VENETA

Left: Cardigan NANUSHKA Trousers IZABELLA BILINSKA Shoes LOEWE Right: Knit PRONOUNCE Shorts LOEWE Shoes JIL SANDER

Leather jacket DIESEL Jeans VALENTINO Shoes Model’s own

Top CLAN Skirt Stylist’s own Tights Stylist’s own Shoes DIOR Skirt on rail BOSS Bag on floor TOD’S

DIOR HOMME

HERMÈS

Shirt ARMANI Top ARMANI Trousers ARMANI Shoes UGO PAULON

PRADA

Photography Moritz Tibes

Styling Julie Velut

Set design Anna Barnett

Hairstyling Moe Mukai

Make up Grace Ellington

Models Shu at XDIRECTN, Teddy at XDIRECTN, Maude at The Hive Management, Alec at IMM

Casting FOUND Casting

This article is taken from Port issue 30. To continue reading, buy the issue or subscribe here

Men

BOTTEGA VENETA X MUBI release a short film on masculinity

What makes a man? One answer to this riddle was first given in the Middle Ages by Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus, the Catholic priest and social critic: “vestis virum facit”, or, “clothes makes the man.” The intimate act of dressing and undressing is the focus of a short film created in partnership with the Italian luxury brand BOTTEGA VENETA and the film streaming platform that has been a blessing under lockdown – MUBI.

 

The ritual has been captured and orchestrated by London-born photographer and filmmaker Tyrone Lebon and Daniel Lee, creative director of the house since 2018. Reflections on the modern state of masculinity and what (and why) they wear are given by a diverse range of talent that inspire Lee, from actor Barry Keoghan (Dunkirk, Chernobyl), Italian danseur Roberto Bolle, to musical titans Neneh Cherry and Tricky (the latter was recently showcased in Steve McQueen’s Tate retrospective show in Girls, Tricky (2001) singing “Girls, Boys / Girls wish you never had boys / They grow up to be bad boys / Cry I’ve never had boys / Never seen your dad boy / I’ve never seen my dad boy”).

Although beautiful, product refreshingly takes a back seat – it is not tied to a collection, season or event – with genuine attention and care given to the subjects and subject. If you’re looking for some feature length films on the site that explore what makes a man, we’d recommend Moonlight, Pain and Glory, Hoop Dreams, GUO4 and The Selfish Giant.

bottegaveneta.com

Bottega Veneta Pre Fall 2019

Port examines the bold new collection from Bottega Veneta’s new creative director, Daniel Lee

When German designer Tomas Maier stepped down as creative director of Bottega Veneta after seventeen years of service, many wondered who could fill the void his departure left. Enter Daniel Lee, the 32 year old British designer relatively unknown outside the industry, but who has made a bold, confident statement with his first collection. Pre fall 2019 heralds a fresh, modernist perspective and understated aesthetic, acting as the first glimpse of a new era. 

Graduating from Central Saint Martins in 2011, Lee was most recently director of ready-to-wear at Céline under Phoebe Philo, and previously worked for Maison Margiela, Balenciaga and Donna Karan. Elegant, soft and generous, the collection lays out the foundations of his future direction and establishes signature shapes and silhouettes using textiles like leather, silk, and wool. The harmony between the men’s and women’s clothing is a conscious decision, both playing with looser proportions and sharing a sensuality that Lee honed whilst working at Céline. The iconic intrecciato weave has now become magnified with giant criss-crossing leather panels on pants and bags. Rich natural colours like cordovan, espresso, amber and oxblood compliment and contrast with the brands recognisable chalk and Milanese black.

For Lee, “maintaining the ingrained codes of Bottega Veneta, craftsmanship, quality and sophistication,” was fundamental to the collection, adding that he “looks forward to evolving what has gone before.”. By staying true to the fashion house’s natural materials and Italian heritage, whilst at the same time offering progressive change, Lee has demonstrated that the luxury label is ready for a reset. How this manifests itself exactly will be illustrated at the AW19 show in February, 2019.  

bottegaveneta.com

Reflections

As Bottega Veneta launch the fifth and sixth instalment in their series of films for Spring/Summer 2018, Port speaks to the man behind them – one of the most experienced art directors in the business, Fabien Baron – about the ever changing nature of media

Reflections, a six part film anthology for Bottega Veneta’s Spring/Summer 2018 campaign, is the latest chapter of the ‘Art of Collaboration’, a project set-up by the fashion house’s creative director Tomas Maier in 2001. Designed to promote partnerships between Bottega Veneta and great artistic talents, their latest collaborator – following in the wake of Jurgen Teller, Ryan McGinley and Nan Goldin – is the celebrated French art director and editor, Fabien Baron.

Baron began his media career in 1982 as art director for Barneys in New York and has gone on to direct celebrated campaigns for Calvin Klein, Giorgio Armani and Burberry, as well as working at Italian Vogue, French Vogue, Interview Magazine and Harper’s Bazaar, during the vital time when publications began to make the painful shift towards digital media. Now CCO of Baron & Baron, a boutique advertising agency, Baron spoke to Port from his office in New York about the collaboration with Bottega Veneta, how media has evolved during his time in the industry, and what images mean in the age of Instagram.

Fabien Baron. Photography Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott

How did the collaboration with Bottega Veneta come about?

We wanted to see how we could communicate a fashion brand in the technological age. We decided the best approach would be film. Fashion is always communicated through print, which is still effective, but I think it’s important for fashion to be accessible in other media. Bottega Veneta is about storytelling and film is the best medium to develop narrative.

Digital media has emerged during your career. How have you seen things change?

I think with social media the quality has gone down. Everything has to be accessible, everyone is posting selfies. It feels like all the brands are posting really low quality content. Now some are turning around and starting to realise they need to put in the same effort as with print. When communication was about print, luxury brands used it to make a big statement for the season and it was the way they built their DNA. Image was really important and everything was so carefully presented. On social media, people want ‘real things’ so now the brands are showing a side of themselves that is different and not always the best. But they feel that that’s what they have to do. If it continues that way they will lose their own DNA.

Aurora

Have you had to adapt and change, or are you essentially doing the same as you did before?

I’ve always been someone who works with different mediums anyway. I was doing film twenty five years ago, while others have only just begun to use it because they realised that’s what people want now. I know what I’m talking about with film. I know what’s possible and what doesn’t work.

I’ve also adapted to digital because I’m very curious. Early on I looked at it as a thing of the future and predicted that print would lose power to digital. I’m not surprised that’s where we are now. We can tweak a concept slightly to fit different platforms, so with Bottega we wanted to make a narrative through film but when you look at the prints it still feels like film because of the way it’s presented in strips.

Vertigo

How do you see the relationship between print and digital going in the future? 

I think digital is only an addition and I don’t believe that print is dead. I think it will stay pretty much the way we are now. Maybe print will get a bit smaller and more specific, more classic. Print will always have a certain quality because it’s a still image, but we need to be careful that these still images retain an iconic presence because nowadays we are bombarded with imagery.

The images should be consistent and recognisable – brands are too quick to try different things for a new trend on Instagram but is that the smart thing to do? Everybody and their mothers can do the back and forth Boomerang effect, it’s not really very smart. What is the brand’s message? And how can they communicate it in the best way possible that’s adapted to multiple channels of expression? I’ve been thinking about that a lot.

bottegaveneta.com