Still Yawning


Left: Jacket GENEVIEVE Shirt KIKO KOSTADINOV Trousers KIKO KOSTADINOV Shoes KIKO KOSTADINOV Right: Jumper LOEWE Trousers PRONOUNCE Shoes BOTTEGA VENETA

CANALI Sunglasses Stylist’s own

Top ACNE STUDIO Skirt ACNE STUDIO Corset IZABELLA BILINSKA Sunglasses MICHAEL KORS AT LUXOTTICA Shoes KIKO KOSTADINOV

Jacket LOEWE T-shirt MARTINE ROSE Trousers PER GÖTESSON Shoes MARTINE ROSE

Jumper BOTTEGA VENETA Trousers BOTTEGA VENETA Scarf ACNE STUDIO Shoes BOTTEGA VENETA

Left: Cardigan NANUSHKA Trousers IZABELLA BILINSKA Shoes LOEWE Right: Knit PRONOUNCE Shorts LOEWE Shoes JIL SANDER

Leather jacket DIESEL Jeans VALENTINO Shoes Model’s own

Top CLAN Skirt Stylist’s own Tights Stylist’s own Shoes DIOR Skirt on rail BOSS Bag on floor TOD’S

DIOR HOMME

HERMÈS

Shirt ARMANI Top ARMANI Trousers ARMANI Shoes UGO PAULON

PRADA

Photography Moritz Tibes

Styling Julie Velut

Set design Anna Barnett

Hairstyling Moe Mukai

Make up Grace Ellington

Models Shu at XDIRECTN, Teddy at XDIRECTN, Maude at The Hive Management, Alec at IMM

Casting FOUND Casting

This article is taken from Port issue 30. To continue reading, buy the issue or subscribe here

Paris Fashion Week 2018

Port‘s fashion editor picks the best looks from the Paris Spring Summer 2019 shows

Paris was hot, the schedule cramped and the calibre of designers high. Conversion centred on the clash of titans: Kim Jones v Virgil Abloh – Jones, the fashion darling’s master craftsman, launched his debut at Dior, and Abloh, the self-made cult figure of streetwear, did the same at Louis Vuitton. Very good friends, both have the press, celebrity appeal, and the power to drive menswear in two very different directions – Kim pushing towards couture and Abloh humbling luxury fashion by including it in a wider cultural conversation. 

Dior – LOOK 35

The much anticipated debut collection from Kim Jones delivered in abundance; a breathtakingly chic parade of soft pinks, blues, tans and whites that took form in a diverse range of suiting, shorts, shirts and beautifully crafted coats and jackets. Models circled a towering cartoon-like floral sculpture created by Dior collaborator and New York street artist, KAWS. The giant ‘BFF’ companion mascot seemed triumphant as it heralded a new dawn for the elevation of both menswear and Dior Homme. Accomplishing his self-assigned mission to translate “feminine couture identity into a masculine idiom”, here Jones transcends the simple overcoat with a weightless transparency and florals sculpted from feathers. True luxury.

Hermès – LOOK 48

While remaining true to the brand’s luxury codes, Hermès’s long-standing designer Veronique Nichanian added subtle touches of streetwear and splashes of bold colour to bring the house up to date with modern trends for Spring Summer 19. Set in the historic Cloître des Cordeliers courtyard on breezy Saturday evening, with Hermes’ crisp white laundry hanging on lines overhead, models sauntered by nonchalantly, as if holidaying on the French Rivera. The fabrics remained luxury and the collection, on the whole, effortless, but the inclusion of season highlights such as the use of yellow and, in this look, the headline making ‘short’ short, proved the continued relevance of the brand.

Dunhill – LOOK 25

Continuing to shake things up in his second year at the creative helm of the British heritage brand, Mark Weston presented a collection that was elegant, fluid and subversive. The arched passageway of the Jacques-Decour private school was the perfect backdrop for this lesson in modern tailoring, with Weston questioning “notions of taste and aspiration, particularly those related to certain ideas of British clothing cultures” with looks designed to blur class boundaries – in this instance a sublime suit wore shirtless to increase its street credibility.

Loewe – LOOK 17

Jonathan Anderson wanted to tell ‘intimate stories of bohemian life’ through his SS19 collection of oversized knits, casual linens, and hippy-like, eccentric prints, which included the surprise motif of Disney favourite Dumbo. The presentation style was as laid-back as the collection: models rotated, clothes were hung so the tactile fabrics could be touched, and brightly coloured pom-poms covered the floor playfully. The collection was accompanied by images of the models casually placed in and around an empty Madrid mansion – painting, musing or relaxing, and continuing this idea of romanticised decadence. Ready-to-wear was of course accompanied by leather bags, the origin of the Loewe brand – in this look, a practical butter-soft brown rucksack that perfectly compliments a sun-bleached effect tie-dyed shirt and short combo.

Louis Vuitton – LOOK 37

The fashion industry waited with bated breath for Virgil Abloh’s debut at Louis Vuitton, eager to see how the streetwear giant would translate his urban style into a luxury product. As if symbolic of Abloh’s meteoric rise, the seemingly endless rainbow runway in the Jardin du Palais Royal gave a sense of optimism and change. A parade of all-white tailoring – neat jackets and shirts teamed with relaxed over-sized trousers – was followed by Abloh’s familiar territory of technical wear, harnesses, flashes of neon and bold colours, including this red look: sportswear-influenced in its silhouette yet elevated by styling and an elegant brown leather trench.

Illustration Jayma Sacco

Visual AIDS: Loewe x David Wojnarowicz

Jonathan Anderson, creative director of LOEWE, speaks to Port about his new limited edition collection, honouring the legacy of artist and activist David Wojnarowicz

David Wojnarowicz, Untitled (One day this kid…), 1990-91

Just months before being diagnosed with AIDS, artist David Wojnarowicz watched close friend and one-time lover Peter Hujar die from complications of the disease in 1987. He expressed the agony of situation in the way he knew best – a brutally candid and furious account in the essay Close to the Knives and a series of photographs taken at Hujar’s deathbed.

Wojnarowicz – who produced film, installation, sculpture, performance, photography, painting and writing – was uninhibited in his ability to drag the seedy and suppressed aspects of society into the light with an urgency that meant his art can hardly be divorced from his activism. Committed to battling the US government’s denial of the AIDS crisis, which had claimed the lives of so many of his friends, he was an outspoken and daring critic. To him, the inability of the government to react was symptomatic of a marginalisation and neglect that he felt personally, since an abusive childhood left him on the streets, where he fell into prostitution. At a 1988 ACT UP demonstration he marched in a jacket that read: ‘If I die of AIDS – forget burial – just drop my body on the steps of the FDA.’

David Wojnarowicz, Jean Genet Masturbating in Metteray Prison, 1983

Wojnarowicz died in 1992 aged 37, not long before HIV became a manageable virus and ceased to be a death sentence. He had became famous for his art – at times slow and enigmatic, at others fiery and frantic – through his involvement in the East Village art scene of the 1980s, but over the course of his life the struggle against AIDS became his central cause. Inspired by both aspects of Wojnarowicz’s work, director of LOEWE, Jonathan Anderson, is honouring the artist’s legacy by selecting four works by the artist to be reproduced on limited edition T-shirts, with proceeds going to the charity Visual AIDS.

David Wojnarowicz, Untitled (Face in Dirt), 1990

The LOEWE FOUNDATION is also participating in Madrid’s PHotoESPAÑA for the 8th time this year with an exhibition devoted to the photographs of Peter Hujar and David Wojnarowicz running until 26th August. The exhibition features works rarely seen outside of private collections and offers a vision of downtown Manhattan in an era of radical social and political upheaval, revealing the influence Hujar had over Wojnarowicz as a mentor.

David Wojnarowicz, Untitled, c.1982

Growing up I was always aware of David Wojnarowicz’s work. When I first went to Montreal I remember finding a book on him. The emotion of the work really means a lot to me and every time I look to his imagery it provokes a reaction. The 1980s in New York was an amazing moment, where there was a response to political change and political moments, in terms of the AIDS crisis, and people did not hold back in the way they turned to creativity to address their problems.

I was in a meeting one day and I thought I’d really like to do something to help a charity like Visual AIDS, and because I love Wojnarowicz’s work I was thinking how to get the work out there. Both the Worjanorwicz estate and his gallery P.P.O.W were incredibly helpful in making this project happen. I chose the four artworks to show the scope of Wojnarowicz’s work. – Jonathan Anderson

loewe.com

Writer, humorist and cultural commentator Fran Lebowitz will be in conversation with New York art dealer Gracie Mansion to discuss the cultural atmosphere of Worjanorwicz’s New York. 27th June, Mistral Amphitheatre, Palacio de Linares, Madrid.