Reflections On a City

Valentin Hennequin and Georgia Thompson’s sleek shoot on the streets of Paris

Full look Lemaire, additional under shirt Dries Van Noten, briefcase by Berluti

L: Shirt, jumper, jacket and bag Dior Men, trousers Zegna, shoes Lemaire. R: Full look Bottega Veneta

Shirt Ernest W.Baker, suit Brioni, coat and tie Dunhill, shoes Hermès

L: Full look Louis Vuitton, tie Dunhill. R: Shirt Ernest W.Baker, suit Brioni, tie Dunhill, shoes Hermès

Full look Miu Miu, roll neck stylists own, trousers Zegna

Full look and scarf Hermès, shoes Prada

Full look Prada

Full suit Celine, coat GmbH

Full look Givenchy

Photography Valentin Hennequin
 
 
 
 
Styling assistant Ophelie Cozette

Dreamboat


Hat CELINE Necklace CELINE Belt CELINE Trousers CELINE Vest HANRO Phone cover RIMOWA


CANALI

ZEGNA

DUNHILL

SAINT LAURENT BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO

LOUIS VUITTON

PRADA

TOD’S

SALVATORE FERRAGAMO

JOHN LOBB

DIOR

Shirt VALENTINO Necklace VALENTINO GARAVANI

JIL SANDER BY LUCIE AND LUKE MEIER

Photography Marie Valognes 

Styling Lune Kuipers

Models Akachi, Nicolas, Idrisse 

Special thanks to Coline and Sarah

This article is taken from Port issue 30. To continue reading, buy the issue or subscribe here

New Heights


Ungho: Coat FENDI. Luard: Shirt PAUL SMITH, Scarf DUNHILL, Trousers PAUL SMITH

Coat & knitted body PRADA, Hat BERLUTI

Jacket DUNHILL, Trousers SALVATORE FERRAGAMO

Luard: Coat DIOR. Ungho: Full look ALEXANDER MCQUEEN

Shirt VALENTINO, Trousers VALENTINO

Ungho: Full look JIL SANDER BY LUCIE & LUKE MEIER. Luard: Top BOTTEGA VENETA, Trousers MARGARET HOWELL, Boots FENDI

GIORGIO ARMANI

Luard: Shirt and trousers NANUSHKA, Roll-neck BERLUTI, Shoes PRADA. Ungho: Full look CANALI

Ungho: Scarf SAINT LAURENT BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO, Shirt MARGARET. Luard: Coat BOTTEGA VENETA, Shirt CELINE BY HEDI SLIMANE, Trousers AMI, Shoes BOTTEGA VENETA

Full look HERMÈS

Luard: Jacket NANUSHKA, Shirt GUCCI, Trousers DUNHILL. Ungho: Coat MARGARET HOWELL, Scarf MARGARET HOWELL

Luard: Coat CELINE BY HEDI SLIMANE, Hoodie CELINE BY HEDI SLIMANE, Trousers SALVATORE FERRAGAMO, Shoes PRADA. Ungho: Jacket FENDI, Roll-neck FENDI, Trousers BOTTEGA VENETA, Shoes BOTTEGA VENETA

Photography Conor Clinch

Styling Mitchell Belk

Models Luard and Ungho at Elite London

Grooming Asahi Sano at Caren using Bumble and Bumble

Casting Ikki Casting

Production Kat Perry

This article is taken from Port issue 29. To continue reading, buy the issue or subscribe here

Loculus

dunhill’s house icon – where the old guard meets the new

Alfred Dunhill was an industrious man. After inheriting his father’s saddlery business in 1893, at the tender age of 21, he set about creating a line of accessories for the fledgling automobile market. The catalogue soon counted over 1,300 items: lamps, goggles, pens, timepieces, leather overcoats, picnic sets – ‘everything but the motor’ ran the tagline. Restless, Dunhill sold his shares over a decade later and set about proselytising his love of tobacco, patenting a ‘windshield pipe’ to allow for a casual smoke when driving; launching the first fully enclosed lighter to be used with just one hand; and supplying, among others, the Prince of Wales, Siegfried Sassoon and Winston Churchill. His international appetite meant that his luxury goods and discerning brand of British-executive style was formally established not only in London, but New York and Paris by 1924. Despite the scale of his ambitions Dunhill understood that, in his own words, “Little ideas well worked bring fortunes.”

This self-same ingenuity, and faith that good things come in small packages, is present in dunhill’s new house icon: the Lock Bag. A celebration of the old guard meeting the new – the slight item’s design inspired by the classic attaché or diplomat case – its frame is lined with padded nylon and finished with box calf leather, a durable full grain that gently ages over time, giving each item a unique patina. “Leather goods are quintessential to dunhill,” notes creative director Mark Weston. “They are definitive pieces born from the house’s beginnings as a leather-harness family business; for me it’s a continuity, revisiting and evolving product in a natural and real way.” First seen on the Paris runway last autumn, removable shoulder straps allow for either cross-body or pochette styling. Available in black, ink, oxblood and – referencing their founder’s iconic Rollagas lighters – limited AD brass and AD silver, the bag has been reimagined for spring in white eel skin with palladium-plated metalwork. Part of a wider lock collection, including a messenger bag and case, it is the perfect size for just about everything (but the motor).

dunhill.com

Photography Benjamin Swanson, styling Paulina Piipponen 

This article is taken from Port issue 28. To continue reading, buy the issue or subscribe here

Paris Fashion Week 2018

Port‘s fashion editor picks the best looks from the Paris Spring Summer 2019 shows

Paris was hot, the schedule cramped and the calibre of designers high. Conversion centred on the clash of titans: Kim Jones v Virgil Abloh – Jones, the fashion darling’s master craftsman, launched his debut at Dior, and Abloh, the self-made cult figure of streetwear, did the same at Louis Vuitton. Very good friends, both have the press, celebrity appeal, and the power to drive menswear in two very different directions – Kim pushing towards couture and Abloh humbling luxury fashion by including it in a wider cultural conversation. 

Dior – LOOK 35

The much anticipated debut collection from Kim Jones delivered in abundance; a breathtakingly chic parade of soft pinks, blues, tans and whites that took form in a diverse range of suiting, shorts, shirts and beautifully crafted coats and jackets. Models circled a towering cartoon-like floral sculpture created by Dior collaborator and New York street artist, KAWS. The giant ‘BFF’ companion mascot seemed triumphant as it heralded a new dawn for the elevation of both menswear and Dior Homme. Accomplishing his self-assigned mission to translate “feminine couture identity into a masculine idiom”, here Jones transcends the simple overcoat with a weightless transparency and florals sculpted from feathers. True luxury.

Hermès – LOOK 48

While remaining true to the brand’s luxury codes, Hermès’s long-standing designer Veronique Nichanian added subtle touches of streetwear and splashes of bold colour to bring the house up to date with modern trends for Spring Summer 19. Set in the historic Cloître des Cordeliers courtyard on breezy Saturday evening, with Hermes’ crisp white laundry hanging on lines overhead, models sauntered by nonchalantly, as if holidaying on the French Rivera. The fabrics remained luxury and the collection, on the whole, effortless, but the inclusion of season highlights such as the use of yellow and, in this look, the headline making ‘short’ short, proved the continued relevance of the brand.

Dunhill – LOOK 25

Continuing to shake things up in his second year at the creative helm of the British heritage brand, Mark Weston presented a collection that was elegant, fluid and subversive. The arched passageway of the Jacques-Decour private school was the perfect backdrop for this lesson in modern tailoring, with Weston questioning “notions of taste and aspiration, particularly those related to certain ideas of British clothing cultures” with looks designed to blur class boundaries – in this instance a sublime suit wore shirtless to increase its street credibility.

Loewe – LOOK 17

Jonathan Anderson wanted to tell ‘intimate stories of bohemian life’ through his SS19 collection of oversized knits, casual linens, and hippy-like, eccentric prints, which included the surprise motif of Disney favourite Dumbo. The presentation style was as laid-back as the collection: models rotated, clothes were hung so the tactile fabrics could be touched, and brightly coloured pom-poms covered the floor playfully. The collection was accompanied by images of the models casually placed in and around an empty Madrid mansion – painting, musing or relaxing, and continuing this idea of romanticised decadence. Ready-to-wear was of course accompanied by leather bags, the origin of the Loewe brand – in this look, a practical butter-soft brown rucksack that perfectly compliments a sun-bleached effect tie-dyed shirt and short combo.

Louis Vuitton – LOOK 37

The fashion industry waited with bated breath for Virgil Abloh’s debut at Louis Vuitton, eager to see how the streetwear giant would translate his urban style into a luxury product. As if symbolic of Abloh’s meteoric rise, the seemingly endless rainbow runway in the Jardin du Palais Royal gave a sense of optimism and change. A parade of all-white tailoring – neat jackets and shirts teamed with relaxed over-sized trousers – was followed by Abloh’s familiar territory of technical wear, harnesses, flashes of neon and bold colours, including this red look: sportswear-influenced in its silhouette yet elevated by styling and an elegant brown leather trench.

Illustration Jayma Sacco

A Quiet Revolution: dunhill AW17

Shot for dunhill by Port Creative, we reflect on the reimagined classics and relaxed shapes of the iconic brand’s Autumn Winter 2017 collection

The history of the men’s luxury retail brand dunhill has been one of constant reinvention. Founded after Alfred Dunhill inherited his father’s saddlery business in 1893 at the age of 21, the company began by offering a range of accessories deigned to capitalise on the burgeoning automobile industry, including leather overcoats, goggles and car horns. From there Dunhill moved into tobacco, patenting the ‘Windsheild Pipe’ in 1904, allowing drivers to smoke in their open top cars, and opening a tobacconists in Mayfair that became popular with the Gentlemen’s clubs in the area.

Since then, dunhill has gradually diversified and expanded to become one of the most recognisable British luxury brands operating today, and their latest reinvention this season comes courtesy of Mark Weston. Having joined dunhill as creative director earlier in the year from Burberry, where he worked as senior vice president of menswear, Weston promised “a new vision” for the brand. And it’s a vision borne out in a collection, where outerwear has been reimagined for contempoary living – overcoats having been relaxed and tailored to be suited more casual settings, and down-filled outerwear and multi-functional parkas have been teamed with suede tennis shoes to meet the demands of an active, modern lifestyle.

Evening wear, too, has been rethought, with dark chocolate velvets revitalising classic styles, while knitted merino blousons have been topped with fur-trimmed collars and paired with the ever-essential English Chelsea boot.

Together with the relaxed, casual approach to Spring Summer, dunhill is entering a new era – breaking new ground while staying true to their history by refusing to stagnate. Self-assured and confident, understated and elevated, it’s a move that is perfectly encapsulated in their collection, and bodes well for the future of Weston’s time at the brand’s helm.

https://www.dunhill.com/gb

dunhill: Our London

Celebrate the capital through the eyes and minds of an architect, a chef, an entrepreneur and an adventurer, each with a unique story to tell about their city 

This month, dunhill has partnered with Port to present a series of four films exploring London through the eyes and minds of an architect, a chef, an entrepreneur and an adventurer. Chung Qing Li, Michel Roux Jr., Robert Scott-Lawson and Matthew Robertson are men of style and substance, each with a unique story to tell about their city.

Watch the full films from the Our London series here.

Michel Roux Jr. – Chef

Michel Roux Jr. is a Michelin-star chef and patron, and a man of classic taste and style. His restaurant La Gavroche, in London’s Mayfair, is one of the finest in the country. The name Roux is synonymous with French haute cuisine in Britain.

Matthew Robertson – Adventurer

Adventurer and filmmaker Matthew Robertson is a Londoner that finds peace in the wilderness. As the founder of Momentum Adventure, he scours the earth seeking out unique experiences and environments.

Chun Qing Li – Architect

Architect and entrepreneur Chun Qing Li is the founder of China Design Week and KREOD, an award-winning interior design and architecture practice in London. Standout designs include the China International Trade Pavilion built for the Rio Olympic Games 2016.

Robin Scott-Lawson – Entrepreneur

Robin Scott-Lawson is an established entrepreneur and has called London home since he was 18 years old. His London-based agency My Beautiful City specialises in high-end art direction, experiential marketing and event production. 

Watch the full films from dunhill’s Our London series here

A Port Creative production 

Photography: Christophe Meimoon at Quadriga Management
Styling:  Dan May
Grooming: Grooming by Tyler Johnston @ One Represents using Moroccanoil and Givenchy La Make Up
Production: Emma Viner
Interviewer:  George Upton
Editorial Director: Dan Crowe
 
Film Production Studio: Black Sheep Studios
Producer:  Michelle Hagen
Director:  Simon Lane 
DOP:  Tom Sweetland 
Exec Producer:  Dan Keefe

Spotlight: Dunhill AW16

John Ray’s LC:M presentation was all about the airdried double-faced cashmere blazers

British. Blue. Blazer. Three words that sum up the dunhill AW16 collection, or at least the jackets. When John Ray’s classic Brit brand moved in at The Savile Club over the weekend, dunhill laid out a sartorial spread of velvet, cashmere and merino wool.

Formal evening wear and a sort of dunhill version of ‘sportswear’ (think clothes to drive fast cars in) was all present, but it was the blazers that dominated. It’s not a new dunhill garment, rather a staple that’s been recreated in an array of rich fabrications including the finest airdried double-faced cashmere, doing away with the need for linings. Here, John Ray explains why the blazer is part of the dunhill DNA.

“Anytime you research you see men, beautiful men, elegant men, they always own a blazer. Double breasted, single breasted always in blue, says Ray. “There can be confusion with the definition between blazer and a sports jacket. A blazer is always blue, anything that isn’t then becomes a sports jacket. We love the blue blazer, it’s very British.”