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Why Menswear Went Mad for Monogramming

From TB to GG: spelling out the best of today's monogrammed menswear.

Logos have always carried cultural cachet, but nowhere quite as strongly as within the world of streetwear: a place where swooshes, stripes and box logos reign supreme.

Though far from a recent phenomenon, the streetwear aesthetic has, in recent years, transcended its countercultural roots, rising to the very top of the fashion pyramid. Where high-end once trickled down to the streets, today the most refined of houses are looking outside for inspiration, in turn redefining what constitutes luxury.

Where once a monogrammed leather wallet was among a brand's most covetable wares, today we're often more likely to lust after T-shirts, sweaters and backpacks covered in the same insignias. It's a return to the logo mania of the ’90s, fuelled by the rise of the social media snap, in which quiet luxury will always be beaten by loud, proud branding. Below, we explore three brands who've reworked their heritage in the guise of forward-thinking streetwear.

Burberry Reborn

When Ricardo Tisci arrived at Burberry, his first act was to retire the brand's equestrian logo and introduce a brand-new visual identity to match his fresh approach. Created in collaboration with legendary graphic designer Peter Saville, the new Burberry signature takes the form of its founder's initials, an interlocking TB that has quickly become as identifiable as Thomas Burberry's iconic check.

Fendi Forever

For what is one of fashion's most instantly recognisable emblems, the Fendi double F comes from surprisingly modest origins. The late Karl Lagerfeld created the insignia upon joining the brand in 1965, sketching it in just five seconds. Originally the FF stood for ‘fun fur’, though in recent years the brand's popularity has lain within its futuristic sportswear and decadent leather accessories, which rework the Fendi monogram with confidence.

Go Go Gucci

Monogram mania stems from fashion's current wont for maximalism, a trend almost single-handedly brought about by Alessandro Michele at Gucci. Since taking control of the Italian house, Michele has utilised the classic double-G logo heavily, though like at Fendi, his approach is irreverent. The monogram is regularly daubed with tigers, rainbows, spaceships – each of which are fast becoming house codes in their own right.